Book Reviews

Book Review: “Tears We Cannot Stop” by Michael Eric Dyson

“Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon To White America” written by Michael Eric Dyson is an educational and enlightening book about race, American psychology and societal ills written specifically to white Americans.  The book serves as an emotional appeal for the audience to tackle head on America’s avoidance of its destructive history, inhuman, racist structures and the residual outcomes of these actions and institutions.

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Book Review: “The Black Male Handbook” by Kevin Powell

“The Black Male Handbook: A Blueprint for Life” written by Kevin Powell is a collection of essays written to open necessary dialogue.  Topics covered include important and relevant topics ranging from mental health to reforming the definition of manhood to economic empowerment in the Black community.  The basic premise of the work itself, engaging unspoken conversations, is often identified but almost never tackled head on with a spirit of resolution.

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Book Review: “Swing” by Kwame Alexander

Swing“, by Kwame Alexander is the second of three books we will be reviewing as part of our #BooksandBars theme.  We’ve already reviewedOn The Come Up” by Angie Thomas.

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Book Review: “On The Come Up” by Angie Thomas

There are many things that are just so right about “On The Come Up”.  It’s subject matter, likeable characters and well-told story are enough to give it high ratings.  I for one gave it just that: a HIGH FIVE for book dopeness.  But that’s not where the artistry ends.

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Book Review: Sugar by Bernice L. McFadden

I have long been a follower of author and professor, Bernice L. McFadden on social media. Personally I think she is overall an interesting and entertaining follow (Instagram: Bernice L. McFadden). However, I shamefully admit I have not read any of her works until I picked up this book, Sugar. After reading this novel, I will do every thing possible until my last breath to right this tragedy.

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Book Review: Tay Goes To The Game by Phelicia Lang

Someone pleeaassee tell me they had such cool books when I was a child?? Books that had handsome little black boys and girls that looked like me and the little girls I knew. Story lines that are filled with fun times and cool activities. I am so thrilled to join with Multicultural Children’s Book Day (http://multiculturalchildrensbookday.com) as a book reviewer for some absolutely fantastic and diverse books that are just like I described.

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Book Review: Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

If you are like me, your reading selections lead you to occasionally pick the same type of book in consecutive selections. Maybe you go on a crime drama binge or maybe you pick a few historical fiction tiles in a row. I have seen many complain about this issue. But have no fear! I have a perfect reading rut buster: Friday Black by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah.

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Review: Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?

THE NARRATIVE OF DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

As we move from February to March, we move from the cold of the winter to the promise of a rejuvenating spring.  We move ever further away from the history of the past year and plant our feet firmly in to the optimistic future of the new calendar.  We also make a unique transition from an ultra focus on Black History to a finer appreciation of Women’s History.  Although accidental, our group’s choice of #BookoftheMonth for February and March and my personal reading choice in between seem fitting and inspirational at the same time.

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Electric Arches

I Don’t Know Squat About Black Women…and Other Things Eve Ewing Brought To My Attention

So be honest, Black man.  I mean really and truly honest.  Do you think you know Black women? I mean do you think you know enough about their passions, their goals, how they feel about Black men?  How they feel when they are approached by Black men?  How they feel when they get THE perfect hair care product?  If you were interviewed, do you think you can give a fair assessment of the psyche of the Black woman?  Yeah?  So how much?  Like 10%?  20%?  95%?!?

If you answered yes to any of the previous questions, you sir are delusional! 

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I Can’t Make This Up: Life Lessons

Synopsis of “I Can’t Make This Up: Life Lessons”

According to the three people who have seen Kevin Hart and a book in the same room, the answer is clear:

A book is compact. Kevin Hart is compact.

A book has a spine that holds it together. Kevin Hart has a spine that holds him together.

A book has a beginning. Kevin Hart’s life uniquely qualifies him to write this book by also having a beginning.

In his literary debut, Kevin Hart takes the reader on a journey through what his life was, what it is today, and how he’s overcome each challenge to become the man he is today.

And that man happens to be the biggest comedian in the world, with tours that sell out football stadiums and films that have collectively grossed over $3.5 billion.

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